National Museum of Taiwan Literature
Events
Taiwan Literature Classroom
2011~
Taiwan Literature Classroom Programs are designed to foster creative literary talent and expand the “literary population.”......
Exhibitions & exhibits
Old Architecture New Life
Date: 2011.10.22~2015.8.21 Venue: 1st Floor, Exhibition Room A
The Inner World of Taiwan Literature
Date: 2011.10.22~2015.8.21 Venue: 1st Floor, Exhibition Room A
Information For Visitors
Taiwan Literature Awards
Publications
Sorceress Diguwan
Sorceress Diguwan
Sorceress Diguwan
Sorceress Diguwan
Author:
巴代 Badai
Translator:
Catherine Hsiao
Publisher/Year:
Serenity International, 2013
ISBN:
978-9868234048
Pages:
260
Island of Silence
Island of Silence
Island of Silence
Island of Silence
Author:
蘇偉貞 Su Wei-chen
Translator:
Jeremy Tiang
Publisher/Year:
Ethos books, 2013
ISBN:
978-981-07-7994-8
Pages:
269
The Man with Compound Eyes
The Man with Compound Eyes
The Man with Compound Eyes
The Man with Compound Eyes
Author:
吳明益 Wu Ming-yi
Translator:
Darryl Sterk
Publisher/Year:
Harvill Secker 2013
ISBN:
978-1846556715
Pages:
301
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Winter 2013
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Winter 2013
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Winter 2013
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Winter 2013
Author:
古塵等 Gu Chen et al.
Translator:
陶忘機等
Publisher/Year:
中華民國筆會,2013
ISSN:
2077-0448
Pages:
223
Introduction:
Since 1990, Taiwan’s Council of Cultural Affairs has driven the Chinese Books in Translation project, subsidizing and supporting the publication of 273 mostly literary works over the course of 20 years. In 2010, the Council handed the project management over to the National Museum of Taiwan Literature (NMTL). The museum modified the project name from Chinese Books in Translation to Taiwan Literature in Translation and set up an in-house Taiwan Literature Translation Center to manage the project.
To mark the establishment of the Taiwan Literature Translation Center, the museum publishes this Bibliographical Synopses of Translated Taiwan Literature (1990-2011) for general and specialized audiences, based on the Council’s Handbook of Taiwan Literature in Translation and the Museum’s Handbook of Taiwan Translation and Publication Achievements.
This volume contains entries on more than 240 translated works of Taiwan Literature in Translation published in English, Japanese, French, Korean, German, Czech and Mongolian. For all listed works, bibliographic information is given, along with English synopses written by invited experts from the various language areas and facsimiles of the book covers, thus presenting a complete overview of Taiwan’s literature in translation over the past 20 years.
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Autumn 2013
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Autumn 2013
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Autumn 2013
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Autumn 2013
Author:
夏菁等 Hsia Ching et al.
Translator:
陶忘機等
Publisher/Year:
中華民國筆會,2013
ISSN:
2077-0448
Pages:
169
Introduction:
Bai Qiu ,real name He Jin-rong, born in 1936 in Taichung, Taiwan is one of Taiwan's most important contemporary poets. Bai Qiu’s poetic style is unique, with content themes and formal techniques displaying extreme variety and a high degree of artistic experimentation, vividly representing reality. He has therefore received high praise from all corners of the literary world, and quite a number of his works have appeared in foreign translation. In 1974, Harlekin Press of Pforzheim, Germany, published the first German translation entitled ‘Taiwan's Fire’ (Feuer auf Taiwan). ‘Chansons’ is the second German publication, with 40 of Bai Qiu’s poems selected from his six collections, arranged chronologically, so as to present a complete picture of his development as a poet. Liang Jing-feng, the German translator of both collections, is a German linguist and literary critic who has published many translations. In addition, ‘Chansons’ has been proofread and edited by the German sinologist and literary translator Dr. Wolf Baus. Scholars and cultural critics have hailed these translations as ‘Natural, expertly done, truthful, fresh, and close to Bai Qiu’s spirit and form’ (World Literary Magazine, ed.4, December 2012).
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Summer 2013
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Summer 2013
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Summer 2013
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Summer 2013
Author:
傅予等 Fu-Yu et al.
Translator:
陶忘機等
Publisher/Year:
中華民國筆會,2013
ISSN:
2077-0448
Pages:
182
Introduction:
In this 21st century of cross-cultural communication, the translation of Taiwanese literature continues to provide translators with maximum encouragement and profound revelations. The Korean version of the Taiwanese poet Bai Qiu’s poetry anthology, Fallen Leaves: a Selection of 100 Poems, was published in early December 2012 in Seoul and its name was taken from the poem ‘Fallen Leaves’ in the collection Rosebush of Wind (or Roses in the Wind). It contains a hundred poems. The translator takes responsibility for editing this translation. Preparing to translate Bai’s works, he requested the poet to propose works for translation, but due to health and other reasons the author was unable to do so. The translator then had to select a hundred poems himself from Bai’s early period until the 90’s. This anthology starts from ‘Compass’ contained in his 1958 debut collection, The Death of a Moth, then follows with the later collections Roses in the Wind, Symbols in the Sky (or Sky Symbol), Poetry Plaza, When the Wind Blows You Feel the Tree’s Existence, and Images Drawn from Measurement and Observation. It concludes with the translator’s commentary, the poet’s chronology, an afterword from the translator, and the original texts of all 100 poems. From the 80’s Bai’s poetry started to appear scattered in various literary magazines in Korea. This volume, by Bäum Communications, is the first official edition published in Seoul. The anthology’s cover design is taken from By the Light (2006), by the Korean experienced sculptor Kim Sang Il, the translator’s second-eldest brother. (Kim Sang Ho)
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Spring2013
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Spring2013
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Spring2013
A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE FROM TAIWAN, Spring2013
Author:
周夢蝶等 Chou Meng-tieh et al.
Translator:
陶忘機等
Publisher/Year:
中華民國筆會,2013
ISSN:
2077-0448
Pages:
178
Introduction:
Chu Tien-hsin may be called Taiwan’s foremost female author. The title of her masterpiece The Ancient Capital also serves as the name of this collection of five short stories and novellas. Chu Tien-hsin’s The Ancient Capital (1996) swings back and forth between Taiwan and Kyoto in Japan, moves between the present and the past, and centers on the memories of people rooted in their cities, and their sadness and anger at being cut off.
Early modern Taiwan went through a repeated history of oppression and dictatorship: the Japanese colonial era, the autocratic rule by Chiang Kai-shek and his KMT followers escaped from Mainland China. The complex history of more than ten years of democratization and localization (Taiwanese nationalism) and identity and recognition issues caused repeated obliterations of memories and the building new eras.
In this process of the formation of public history, Chu Tien-hsin buried the violence and opposition conflicting with her personal memories. Thus she employs delicate descriptions of Taipei’s streets and landscapes, vegetation and man-made constructions to give herself one more opportunity to reflect on her personal memories contained in these places. For Koreans who experienced a similar history, Chu Tien-hsin’s novel is meaningful in many ways.
Web Priority A Plus Accessibility Approval